Emotions [Invisibilia]

Podcasts are one of my favorite ways to get different perspectives on things and explore new ideas. This Invisibilia podcast on emotions is mind exploding. If you like podcasts, check this one out. If you experience emotions, same advice.

Pursuing Podcasts

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If you think you know how emotions work, this podcast will turn your world upside-down.  Enough so that you may find yourself arguing that what’s being presented can’t be possible.

Before hearing this, I had a hope that we have more control over how we respond to things than we sometimes think. It’s one of the reasons I started meditating: to learn to not get hooked as much by emotions.

Yet it often feels as if an emotion takes me over, as if I have no “choice” in feeling something. But what if emotion is the interpretation of a physiological feeling? What if it’s a way our body tries to “make sense” of a sensation? What if we do have control?

That’s the idea this episode presents.

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The Lonely American Man

19_Hidden BrainI’m exploring characters. Ones within me are varied: selfish, generous, angry, happy, judgmental, forgiving, and more. There’s a wide range of characters I can identify, and I suspect there are characters deep in the wings I’ve lost touch with; characters that exist for reasons I don’t even know. There’s no doubt it’s good some of them some stay away; I also suspect it would do me good for others to come out.

This podcast from Hidden Brain is, for me, an exploration into men and their characters. We encourage the existence of certain “male traits” within the men of our culture, and we disallow others.  The episode is an exploration of how some characters that are present in young boys—friendship, openness, sensitivity and friend-love—are often destroyed by the time boys become men. There’s a powerful “masculine” cultural tide in which children are raised, a tide that can be difficult to swim against. Parents are “worried” that their boys are “too sensitive,” a trait that flies in the face of “masculinity” in the U.S.

Continue reading “The Lonely American Man”